Mt Lassen

Mt Lassen Student Guidelines

Safety First Label your belongings, and keep track of them. Bring the right clothes for the trip. Never distract drivers while a vehicle is in motion. Pay attention to teachers and chaperones, and follow their directions. Be on time, and stay with the group. Walk, don’t run. When we visit facilities, don’t touch anythingo images unless specifically allowed to by their staff. Do not enter a business and do not make purchases without the teacher’s permission.

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Call for Mt Lassen Chaperones

We currently have four confirmed and two possible chaperones. For this trip we need a minimum of 6 parent chaperones. See the class website for more information about the trip. If you’d like to join us, please contact me soon.

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Mt Lassen Chaperone Information

Academic Goals Practice low-impact camping. Working in small groups, independently prepare, cook and cleanup for all meals. Explore unique volcanic areas, including Cinder Cone, Bumpass Hell, Devastated Area and Subway Cave. Learn about the history and geology of Mt Lassen. Learn about the plant and animal communities of the Mt Lassen area. Learn orientation skills with topographical maps and a compass. Observe the night sky, find the constellations, and learn star navigation.

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Mt Lassen Itinerary

Friday, September 1 Pack inspection in classroom Monday, September 4 School Closed Tuesday, September 5 8:00 am Arrive WSS 8:30 am Depart WSS (262 mi; 5 hrs) (bathroom stops as needed, snacks in cars) 1:30 pm Arrive Butte Lake Campground; Unpack, set up camp 2:00 pm Lunch (in camp groups) 3:00 pm Hike to Bathtub Lake (swimming) 6:00 pm Diner (in camp groups); Explore Butte Lake 7:30 pm Campfire; Telescopes and star navigation 9:00 pm Lights out Wednesday, September 6

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Mt Lassen Packing Lists

Packing lists for students, chaperones and groups.

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The Hazards of DEET

Why DEET Many respond to fears about West Nile Virus (WNV) and the normal annoyance of mosquito bites by slathering on the insect repellent, especially on their children. The most common choice is a DEET-based repellent. A study released in 2003 showed certain DEET-based products to be the most effective, in that they lasted longer than other products. But DEET-based repellents aren’t just hazardous to mosquitoes. From a human health point of view, choosing a botanical-based repellent can make more sense.

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